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22., 23., 24. September 2020
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Chasing wildfires from space


Chasing wildfires from space

To understand fires on Earth, you need a broad view, spanning from the poles to the equator and looking from high above the planet to down deep under the soil. That’s where #NASAExplorers come in. With satellites, airplanes, their own hands and with a data record spanning decades, explorers are studying how the planet burns, and how that burning changes with the climate. In this video, Nasa explorers head to the western Pacific Ocean to the Northwest Territories and beyond to look at fires on Earth.

Continue reading Chasing wildfires from space at Meteorological Technology International.


Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones


Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones

Scientists hope that a new project involving photographing tropical cyclones from the International Space Station (ISS) will help them better predict their severity.

Predicting tropical cyclones’ severity in advance can be crucial for the preservation of life and property. Until now this has been done through flying aircraft close to the hurricanes, but these flights are both dangerous and expensive. Scientists are hoping that data from the NASA-led ISS project will help make such flights obsolete. 

Known as the Tropical Cyclone Intensity Measurements from the ISS (CyMISS) project (or, more simply, the Tropical Cyclone project) researchers are leveraging a camera on the ISS to measure cloud tops in the eyewall of a tropical cyclone.

Continue reading Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones at Meteorological Technology International.


New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate


New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate

A new study has provided scientists with a global picture of how ocean activity influences the lower-level atmosphere and vice versa.

Scientists from the University of Maryland used statistical analysis to study the influence of the ocean on the atmosphere in the extratropics, the regions of Earth poleward of the tropics.

The researchers applied a statistical method for establishing causation known as the Granger Method, named after its creator, the Nobel-laureate mathematician Clive Granger.

“There are many physical processes that govern the interaction between the atmosphere and ocean,” lead author Eviatar Bach, a PhD student in the University of Maryland’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, told Science Daily.

Continue reading New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate at Meteorological Technology International.


Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought


Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought

A new study has revealed that the world’s oceans are absorbing far more of the carbon dioxide released in to the atmosphere by human activity than was previously believed.

Covering two-thirds of Earth’s surface, it has long been known that oceans play a key role in sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide. It was previously estimated that around a quarter of the carbon dioxide we release into the atmosphere is absorbed into the oceans.

However, according to a new study published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles the true figure is closer to a third. Dr David Woolf, of Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt University and the study’s lead author, said, “Our research shows that three gigatonnes of carbon a year are being drawn down into the ocean, which is about a third of the emissions caused by human activity.

Continue reading Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought at Meteorological Technology International.


Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA


Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA

Extreme weather has resulted in at least US$10bn-worth of damage to the US in 2019 so far, according to US government statistics. The economic toll of natural disasters in the country was laid out in a report published by NOAA.

According to the report “there have been 10 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding US$1bn each across the United States” since the start of the year.

These events included three major floods, five severe storm events and two tropical cyclones – Hurricane Dorian and Tropical Storm Imelda. As well as their economic impact, these natural disasters accounted for the deaths of 39 people, according to NOAA.

Continue reading Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA at Meteorological Technology International.


Antarctic warm front reveals influence of stratosphere in shaping weather


Antarctic warm front reveals influence of stratosphere in shaping weather

A rare warming event in the upper atmosphere above Antarctica has given scientists a better understanding of how much the stratosphere influences climate.

Known as sudden stratospheric warming, the phenomenon has raised temperatures in the upper atmosphere by nearly 4.5°C over the past month.

When Australian Bureau of Meteorology climate scientist Eun-Pa Lim input the temperature rise into a short-term forecasting model she had designed, it predicted that the stratospheric warming will drive hot, dry winds across eastern Australia for the next three months, according to a report in the journal Nature.

Continue reading Antarctic warm front reveals influence of stratosphere in shaping weather at Meteorological Technology International.


Arctic research ship selects drifting base for atmospheric study


Arctic research ship selects drifting base for atmospheric study

An ambitious international project to study the climate of the Arctic from a research ship floating in polar ice for a year has reached an important milestone.

Researchers on board the RV Polarstern, which set sail from Tromso in Norway late last month, have selected the ice floe which will serve as their drifting base for the next 13 months.

Known as the Multidisciplinary Drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC), the US$150m project is the largest shipborne polar expedition in history. Researchers hope that data gleaned from the expedition will mark a step-change in climate science.

Continue reading Arctic research ship selects drifting base for atmospheric study at Meteorological Technology International.


Heat waves to at least double in size by middle of century according to new study


Heat waves to at least double in size by middle of century according to new study

As the reality of climate change sets in temperatures this summer reached the highest ever recorded on Earth.

These new temperature highs brought a spate of heat waves, which scientists say are likely to increase in frequency and intensity with global warming. What has been less studied until now is how climate change will affect the spatial size of heat waves in the future.

In a new study funded in part by NOAA and published in Environmental Research Letters, scientists examining this question came up with some startling results.

The scientists found that in a mid-range greenhouse emissions scenario the average spatial size of heat waves could increase by 50% by the middle of this century.

Continue reading Heat waves to at least double in size by middle of century according to new study at Meteorological Technology International.