Nouvelles de l'industrie


India Meteorological Department to predict extreme weather with AI


India Meteorological Department to predict extreme weather with AI

The India Meteorological Department (IMD) is planning to use artificial intelligence to predict extreme weather patterns in its forecasting. The technology could be especially important to warn of weather events occurring within three to six hours.

The state department currently uses technology such as radars and satellite imagery to look into extreme weather patterns occurring in the same day. Last month, in two regions of India alone, 160 people are said to have died because of lightning strikes, and IMD is now hoping to make better use of more advanced technology involving AI.

“Artificial intelligence helps in understanding past weather models and this can make decision making faster,” said Mrutyunjay Mohapatra, director general of IMD, who also stated that the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning in meteorology is not as prevalent as in other fields.

Continue reading India Meteorological Department to predict extreme weather with AI at Meteorological Technology International.


Met Office highlights report warning of significant climate change


Met Office highlights report warning of significant climate change

The Met Office has circulated the latest BAMS (Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society) report that warns of significant climate change recorded in 2019. The 30th edition BAMS report is peer-reviewed, with contributions from climate scientists around the world, including from the Met Office.

The most significant findings from the latest update signal that each decade since 1980 has been successively warmer than the preceding decade, with the most recent (2010-19) rising by around 0.2°C compared with the previous decade. Last year was one of the warmest years since records began in the 1800s, with only 2015 and 2016 (in some data sets) marked as warmer.

Continue reading Met Office highlights report warning of significant climate change at Meteorological Technology International.


NOAA warns an ‘extremely active’ Atlantic Basin hurricane season is possible


NOAA warns an ‘extremely active’ Atlantic Basin hurricane season is possible

An ‘extremely active’ hurricane season is possible in the Atlantic Basin, according to forecasters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center, a division of the US National Weather Service.

Atmospheric and oceanic conditions are primed to fuel storm development in the Atlantic, according to the agency’s annual August update to the Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, initially issued in May.

The reports detail how this year’s Atlantic hurricane season has so far claimed a record-setting nine named storms and has the potential to be one of the busiest ever. Historically, only two named storms form on average by early August, and the ninth named storm typically does not form until October 4.

Continue reading NOAA warns an ‘extremely active’ Atlantic Basin hurricane season is possible at Meteorological Technology International.


Microsite goes live for Biral’s BTD-200 thunderstorm detection system


Microsite goes live for Biral’s BTD-200 thunderstorm detection system

Meteorological equipment specialist Biral has launched a new microsite for its BTD-200 lightning warning system. The revamped design focuses entirely on the BTD-200 and is said to be responsive on desktop, mobile and tablet devices, and is intended to be easy to navigate.

The BTD-200 lightning warning system was released last year and is a modular system that is designed to operate out of the box, and be expandable as requirements grow or change. The essential system comprises a lightning detector that is placed outside – either on its tripod mount or permanently installed – while a PC located indoors runs the supplied Lightning Works software.

Continue reading Microsite goes live for Biral’s BTD-200 thunderstorm detection system at Meteorological Technology International.


DTN WeatherSentry adds RadarScope to global platform


DTN WeatherSentry adds RadarScope to global platform

Businesses that rely on weather data to make critical decisions can now call on another source of detailed radar data as DTN, an independent source of analysis and decision-support solutions, has added RadarScope to its DTN WeatherSentry global platform.

This addition moves advanced radar and display technology to DTN’s online weather solution customized for business users.

Adding RadarScope capabilities to WeatherSentry means users now have access to single site radar data instead of a composite image so detailed weather information is in the hands of the user in a matter of seconds. DTN says that RadarScope is the only weather app that displays the highest native resolution, available across platforms including iOS, Mac, Apple TV, Android, and Windows.

Continue reading DTN WeatherSentry adds RadarScope to global platform at Meteorological Technology International.


Scientists leverage NCAR data set to improve decadal climate prediction


Scientists leverage NCAR data set to improve decadal climate prediction

A number of scientific papers have been released that show a wide range of phenomena across the atmosphere, oceans and land may be predictable a decade in advance.

The papers detail studies that were undertaken using the Decadal Prediction Large Ensemble (DPLE). The DPLE is a freely available database of model simulations developed and housed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

According to the papers, an increase in the likelihood of a Greenland block – a bulge of high pressure that stalls over Greenland and can cause extreme weather both in North America and Europe – could be predictable years in advance.

Continue reading Scientists leverage NCAR data set to improve decadal climate prediction at Meteorological Technology International.


ESA and NASA synchronize missions to improve ice level data


ESA and NASA synchronize missions to improve ice level data

For more than 10 years, the European Space Agency’s (ESA) CryoSat has been returning detailed information on how the height of the earth’s ice fields are changing. However, in a move designed to gain even deeper insight into ice conditions, the satellite’s orbit has been altered so that it can work in tandem with NASA’s ICESat-2 system.

ESA said that while CryoSat carries a radar altimeter, NASA’s ICESat-2 is equipped with a laser measurement system. Both instruments measure the height of ice by emitting a signal and timing how long it takes the signal to bounce off the ice surface and return to the satellite.

Continue reading ESA and NASA synchronize missions to improve ice level data at Meteorological Technology International.


Contract awarded for CO2  monitoring satellites


Contract awarded for CO2  monitoring satellites

OHB System, a German satellite systems specialist, recently secured the contract to supply the European Space Agency (ESA) with two satellites to form the foundations of the agency’s Copernicus Carbon Dioxide Monitoring Mission (CO2M).

OHB will lead an industrial consortium to start building the two satellites. As the main contractor, it will be responsible for the overall project, and is also developing the satellite platforms. As the main sub-contractor, Thales Alenia Space will supply the instruments, including the near-infrared and shortwave-infrared spectrometer that will measure emissions of carbon dioxide.

According to ESA, although ground measurements have made it possible to track general changes in the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, it is not possible to make reliable statements about anthropogenic emissions from individual countries, or even individual regions and cities.

Continue reading Contract awarded for CO<span style="font-size: 50%; vertical-align: sub;">2 </span> monitoring satellites at Meteorological Technology International.