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Combining satellite and radar data provides more accurate forecasts, according to Penn State


Combining satellite and radar data provides more accurate forecasts, according to Penn State

Researchers at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) have found that by combining data from cutting-edge geostationary satellites and traditional weather radar they could generate earlier, more accurate severe weather warnings.

The researchers came to this conclusion after studying supercell thunderstorms in the Midwestern US. “We know satellites have an advantage in producing forecasts earlier, and radar has more confidence in where clouds should be and where thunderstorms will be moving,” said Yunji Zhang, assistant research professor in meteorology and atmospheric sciences at Penn State.

“The question was whether these two types of observations would complement each other if combined together.

Continue reading Combining satellite and radar data provides more accurate forecasts, according to Penn State at Meteorological Technology International.


Mountain summit issues call for action on climate change


Mountain summit issues call for action on climate change

A High Mountain Summit has issued a Call for Action in the face of the rapid melting of the Earth’s frozen peaks and the consequences for food, water and human security, as well as for ecosystems, the environment and economies.

The three-day summit held on October 29-31, convened by the WMO and a wide range of partners, identified priority actions to support more sustainable development, disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation both in high-mountain areas and downstream.

“We, the participants at the WMO High Mountain Summit 2019, hereby commit to the goal that people who live in mountains and downstream should have open access to hydrological, cryospheric, meteorological, and climate information services to help them adapt to and manage the threats imposed by escalating climate change,” said the Call to Action.

Continue reading Mountain summit issues call for action on climate change at Meteorological Technology International.


Weather stations play a crucial role in Bloodhound LSR’s attempt to break the world land speed record


Weather stations play a crucial role in Bloodhound LSR’s attempt to break the world land speed record

In late October 2019, the Bloodhound Land Speed Record (LSR) team revealed the car aiming to break the world land speed record. The team is currently testing the Bloodhound car in the Kalahari Desert, Northern Cape, South Africa.

The vehicle has been developed to travel at supersonic speeds, with the end goal being to match or exceed 1,000mph (1,600km/h). ThrustSSC holds the land speed record at 760mph (1,223km/h), set on October 15, 1997.

On November 6, the Bloodhound car had reached 501mph (806km/h) in 12 seconds, securing its place amongst the top 10 fastest cars in the world.

Continue reading Weather stations play a crucial role in Bloodhound LSR’s attempt to break the world land speed record at Meteorological Technology International.


Meteorologists and shipping industry confront impact of extreme maritime weather


Meteorologists and shipping industry confront impact of extreme maritime weather

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has joined forces with the maritime industry to address the impact of extreme weather at sea. The meteorological body held its first ever joint symposium with the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), which regulates shipping, late last month.

The ‘International Symposium on Extreme Maritime Weather – Towards Safety of Life at Sea and a Sustainable Blue Economy’ was held at the London headquarters of the IMO and attended by representatives from the shipping industry, offshore industry, ports and harbors, coast guards, insurance providers as well as maritime forecasters.

The so-called ‘blue economy’ is estimated to generate between US$3trn and US6trn annually, accounting for 70% of world trade and providing jobs for over six billion people.

Continue reading Meteorologists and shipping industry confront impact of extreme maritime weather at Meteorological Technology International.


Researchers reveal best places to locate wind and solar farms in USA


Researchers reveal best places to locate wind and solar farms in USA

A new study has revealed the optimum places to site wind and solar farms in the USA.

Researchers from the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard University’s TH Chan School of Public Health developed a model based on the US electrical grid, which is divided into 10 regions.

They calculated the benefits of carbon dioxide reduction for each region and energy type by examining the social cost of carbon locally. The social cost is a dollar value attributed to the negative consequences of climate change due to the impacts of extreme weather events, sea level rises and climate-related diseases and health problems.

Continue reading Researchers reveal best places to locate wind and solar farms in USA at Meteorological Technology International.


African forecasting ‘held back by blocked access to historic climate data’


African forecasting ‘held back by blocked access to historic climate data’

Weather forecasting in Africa is reportedly being inhibited by governments wary of allowing access to historical weather data.

According to a report in Nature millions of written records of weather observations going back to the colonial era are languishing in storerooms throughout the continent.

International researchers are keen to digitize the historical climate data, which they say could be crucial in predicting the impact of climate change on the continent. However, African national governments are reluctant to give away data for free which they could potentially sell commercially.

The South African Weather Service (SAWS), for example, has turned down offers from the International Data Rescue (I-DARE) project to help digitize its historical climate data.

Continue reading African forecasting ‘held back by blocked access to historic climate data’ at Meteorological Technology International.


“Revolutionary” method for removing CO2 from air offers hope in climate change battle


“Revolutionary” method for removing CO2 from air offers hope in climate change battle

Researchers at MIT claim to have invented a “revolutionary” method for removing CO2 from the air.

The system, which involves passing air through a stack of charged electrochemical plates, is cheaper and far less energy-intensive than current carbon-capture techniques, say its inventors.

It can also work with the very low CO2 concentration levels found in the atmosphere. This is unlike many carbon-capture methods which require higher concentrations, such as those found in emissions from fossil fuel-based power plants.

The technique is described in a new paper in the journal Energy & Environmental Science by Sahag Voskian, a post-doctoral student at MIT who developed the work during his PhD, and MIT professor of chemical engineering T Alan Hatton.

Continue reading “Revolutionary” method for removing CO2 from air offers hope in climate change battle at Meteorological Technology International.


Study shows California quakes increased stress on major fault line


Study shows California quakes increased stress on major fault line

Researchers have found that a major fault line that has been dormant for at least a century was impacted by a series of earthquakes that hit Southern California last summer.

The study by geologists at the University of Iowa mapped the effects of the Ridgecrest earthquakes, – twin quakes which struck on consecutive days last July in the Mojave Desert.

They found that the quakes caused an effect known as ‘aseismic creep’ along a 16-mile section of the Garlock Fault, a major fault line which runs east to west for 185 miles from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley.

Continue reading Study shows California quakes increased stress on major fault line at Meteorological Technology International.