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2020年9月22~24日
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業界ニュース


NOAA to award US$4.4m for research into tackling rising sea levels


NOAA to award US$4.4m for research into tackling rising sea levels

NOAA is awarding US$4.4m-worth of grants for research into reducing the impact of water-related hazards in coastal areas.

The funding, which will include US$1.5m in fiscal year 2019, will benefit the research efforts of more than 30 academic, government and non-governmental organizations looking at how natural, man-made and restored coastal habitats could mitigate the effects of rising sea levels, flooding and storms.

“As the benefits of natural features are increasingly understood, communities can better evaluate risk reduction solutions for protection beyond traditional hardened shorelines,” said David Kidwell, competitive research program director at NOAA’s National Centres for Coastal Ocean Science.

Continue reading NOAA to award US$4.4m for research into tackling rising sea levels at Meteorological Technology International.


WMO tells summit good data vital to tackling global water crisis


WMO tells summit good data vital to tackling global water crisis

The WMO has stressed the importance of good data for managing the growing problems related to water around the world.

Johannes Cullmann, WMO’s director of climate and water, delivered the message during a keynote address at the Budapest Water Summit on October 16.

“We need robust and resilient data sources,” said Cullmann. “We also must make sure that we get the message to the end users. There are often institutional disconnects in the production and delivery of water-related information, warnings and services to people who need them most.”

Cullmann told the summit that the WMO is focusing on strengthening operational hydrological services and improving monitoring and forecasting as part of a global effort to deal with issues relating to water stress, water-related hazards and water quality.

Continue reading WMO tells summit good data vital to tackling global water crisis at Meteorological Technology International.


Vaisala to modernize Ethiopia’s meteorological infrastructure


Vaisala to modernize Ethiopia’s meteorological infrastructure

Vaisala has announced a two-year US$14m project to modernize Ethiopia’s weather and climate observation and forecasting systems.

Vaisala, a global leader in weather, environmental and industrial measurements, will deliver a turnkey meteorological solution for the National Meteorology Agency (NMA) of Ethiopia. The project expands the Ethiopian meteorological infrastructure and service provision capabilities, matching the needs for reliable early-warnings and forecasting services.

Vaisala will provide a weather radar network integrated with a high-precision lightning detection system covering western, southern, and central Ethiopia. The project will also include an observation network management system that integrates new and existing observation sources, an air quality network for the capital city of Addis Ababa, and a centralized meteorological forecast production system.

Continue reading Vaisala to modernize Ethiopia’s meteorological infrastructure at Meteorological Technology International.


Chasing wildfires from space


Chasing wildfires from space

To understand fires on Earth, you need a broad view, spanning from the poles to the equator and looking from high above the planet to down deep under the soil. That’s where #NASAExplorers come in. With satellites, airplanes, their own hands and with a data record spanning decades, explorers are studying how the planet burns, and how that burning changes with the climate. In this video, Nasa explorers head to the western Pacific Ocean to the Northwest Territories and beyond to look at fires on Earth.

Continue reading Chasing wildfires from space at Meteorological Technology International.


Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones


Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones

Scientists hope that a new project involving photographing tropical cyclones from the International Space Station (ISS) will help them better predict their severity.

Predicting tropical cyclones’ severity in advance can be crucial for the preservation of life and property. Until now this has been done through flying aircraft close to the hurricanes, but these flights are both dangerous and expensive. Scientists are hoping that data from the NASA-led ISS project will help make such flights obsolete. 

Known as the Tropical Cyclone Intensity Measurements from the ISS (CyMISS) project (or, more simply, the Tropical Cyclone project) researchers are leveraging a camera on the ISS to measure cloud tops in the eyewall of a tropical cyclone.

Continue reading Stunning images captured by International Space Station help scientists predict cyclones at Meteorological Technology International.


New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate


New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate

A new study has provided scientists with a global picture of how ocean activity influences the lower-level atmosphere and vice versa.

Scientists from the University of Maryland used statistical analysis to study the influence of the ocean on the atmosphere in the extratropics, the regions of Earth poleward of the tropics.

The researchers applied a statistical method for establishing causation known as the Granger Method, named after its creator, the Nobel-laureate mathematician Clive Granger.

“There are many physical processes that govern the interaction between the atmosphere and ocean,” lead author Eviatar Bach, a PhD student in the University of Maryland’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, told Science Daily.

Continue reading New study reveals widespread influence of oceans on Earth’s climate at Meteorological Technology International.


Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought


Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought

A new study has revealed that the world’s oceans are absorbing far more of the carbon dioxide released in to the atmosphere by human activity than was previously believed.

Covering two-thirds of Earth’s surface, it has long been known that oceans play a key role in sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide. It was previously estimated that around a quarter of the carbon dioxide we release into the atmosphere is absorbed into the oceans.

However, according to a new study published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles the true figure is closer to a third. Dr David Woolf, of Edinburgh’s Heriot-Watt University and the study’s lead author, said, “Our research shows that three gigatonnes of carbon a year are being drawn down into the ocean, which is about a third of the emissions caused by human activity.

Continue reading Oceans absorbing CO2 at much higher rates than previously thought at Meteorological Technology International.


Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA


Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA

Extreme weather has resulted in at least US$10bn-worth of damage to the US in 2019 so far, according to US government statistics. The economic toll of natural disasters in the country was laid out in a report published by NOAA.

According to the report “there have been 10 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding US$1bn each across the United States” since the start of the year.

These events included three major floods, five severe storm events and two tropical cyclones – Hurricane Dorian and Tropical Storm Imelda. As well as their economic impact, these natural disasters accounted for the deaths of 39 people, according to NOAA.

Continue reading Natural disasters costing US$1bn each, says NOAA at Meteorological Technology International.